Recognizing Companies Fueling Change

CSI STARS Recognition Sponsor for Experience Energy's GRIT Awards and Best Energy Workplaces

The statistics are telling

  • By 2030, one in five Americans will be 65 years and over
  • By 2044, more than half of Americans will belong to a minority group
  • More women are receiving two-and four-year degrees than men

Think back to 1983. It was nearly impossible find a woman or visible minority in energy. Only 31,000 women worked in the industry, mainly in administrative positions. Today there are 237,000 women employed in a range of positions. Women now have an unprecedented presence, with 20% in the energy workforce.

Changing history

The face of labor is changing. Millennials account for 50% of the workforce and are the most diverse generation in US history. As the demand for skilled talent exceeds supply, energy executives are turfing their outdated HR prejudices and practices.

Changing demographics and HR technologies are disrupting how companies attract, retain, recognize and reward their people.

What hasn’t changed

Employees are staying with their companies slightly longer than they did three decades ago. In fact, in 1983 the average employee tenure was 3.5 years compared to 4.2 years now (5.1 years in oil and gas).  And important to note, 44% of millennials believe they can advance their careers faster by staying with the same organization than by moving.

What has changed

Millennials are more likely to leave an organization if they don’t feel appreciated or given opportunities to advance.

  • 79% of employees reported “a lack of appreciation” as the key reason for leaving
  • 87% say that professional development or career growth opportunities are very important. 

Celebrate careers and recognize results

It is still best practice to celebrate years of service but today’s employees want to be recognized in real-time, more frequently, in-person, and publicly with social tools they’re familiar with using.

Millennial loyalty needs to be earned – and that does not refer to earning a competitive salary. Today’s young talent would give up a higher paying job for a company that:

  • shows how their contributions are improving the world or community
  • maps out growth opportunities
  • recognizes great work

Leverage technology

Progressive organizations are moving toward mobile-optimized, peer-to-peer social recognition tools to connect people, unite programs and motivate performance.

Inclusion is the key to creating a diverse culture. With today’s recognition tools:

  • Everyone can give thanks, on any device in real-time
  • Employees can welcome new hires
  • Peers can like, share and congratulate others on a job well done
  • Employees can redeem points for gifts or donate to charity
  • Peers can nominate colleagues for doing things that reflect the company’s core values

The leaders who embrace a millennial-mindset and invest in new tools will engage minority communities and women critically vital to meet the industry’s future workforce demands.

More from CSI STARS

As the official recognition partner for the 2019 GRIT Awards℠ & Best Energy Workplaces℠, CSI STARS is honored to recognize the outstanding women and companies fueling positive change in the oil and gas industry. We have seen how small acts of recognition, multiplied by many people, boost careers and improve cultures. To learn more, download these free ROAR (Remind Others to Appreciate and Recognize) Resources.

Don’t miss your opportunity to be a part of the 2019 awards! Become a sponsor or reserve your table today!

GRIT Awards and Best Energy Workplaces

 

Overcoming Challenges Through Persistence and Faith

Meet Patricia Guillory, the Chief Financial Officer of Gulf Copper & Manufacturing Corp.

Gulf Copper provides services for the repair, conversion and refurbishment of offshore drilling rigs, construction and support vessels for the oil and gas industry, and provides marine surveying service internationally. It offers a full spectrum of services with diverse capabilities from strategically well-placed facilities along the Gulf of Mexico. They also happen to be the newest member of the Pink Petro community. And we couldn’t be more thrilled!

Patricia took her position at the age of 29, during a turbulent time with the company.

“At my interview, the owner explained that he could not promise the company would be able to commit to even my job being around in the next six months,” she recalls.

She made it through — with no small amount of persistence and faith. Here’s her story.

What’s the biggest challenge you have faced and how did you overcome it?

PG: The biggest challenge I have faced was taking control of Gulf Copper at the young age of 29. It was at a point in the company’s history when the financial and administration arms faced many challenges.

At my interview, the owner explained that he could not promise the company would be able to commit to even my job being around in the next six months. Employees were anxious at best, and many had low morale. The question for me was where to start on the impressive list of challenges — especially having been the first controller of this 40-plus-year-old organization hired after the bleeding had gone on for some time.

I overcame it with lots of prayers and leaning heavily on my faith. It was through prayer that I developed relationships with those in operations and administration. I also developed relationships with external resources and mentors. I overcame the anxiety of the job, asked many questions, answered many questions and worked excessive hours engaging others, attending meetings and making commitments.

In the end, we overcame these terrific trials and built our way back.

What’s one mistake you made and how did you learn from it?

PG: The one mistake I’ve made on numerous occasions is departing from my center and my faith to make decisions that do not fully consider the impact on others. An example of this is when I moved all the accounting staff from an operations site to the administration offices where I was located. It seemed practical, except it had not been too long since the assets were acquired. I failed to appreciate the full extent of everyone’s anxiety.

What became clear later is that having the groups in close proximity was helpful to merge the distinct company operating cultures within the two groups. A few years ago, we merged the locations and the two groups. Within a few months, nearly all of us agreed that the camaraderie and productivity levels were elevated. Over the years my faith in God has helped me realize that when I fall, I can get back up.

What’s been the most rewarding part of your career?

PG: The most rewarding part has been the mentorships developed (and still developing) with my team. Being able to share the experience with someone learning things they never believed they could master is rewarding.

Who’s been a “gritty” role model for you?

PG: My “gritty” role model is a business-savvy Harvard-educated gentleman who served on our audit committee for many years. He has seen us through some of our most turbulent times and has provided wisdom, knowledge, and strength. And he is always pushing me to take hold of the next challenge without waiver. He has provided constructive critiques at the most important times and always wants the very best for me. I truly appreciate his contributions to my life and the growth in my career.

Dionne Auguste on Building a Personal Brand in a Foreign Land

This week on Profiles in GRIT, we meet Dionne Auguste. Dionne is the operations manager for NES Global Talent in Perth, Australia. NES is a workforce provider that provides staffing solutions across the Oil & Gas, Power, Infrastructure, Life Sciences, Manufacturing and Mining sectors globally. NES offers a diverse workforce and technical recruitment across major projects around the world. Dionne moved to Australia 6 years ago, she did not know anyone and moved without her friends and family, but through perseverance and grit, she overcame the challenges to build a successful career and a personal brand. She focused her efforts on networking and became involved in programs like a local lean in circle, Women in Oil and Gas Australia where she is a mentor. Today, she runs the lean in circles for her region and mentors other women and young professionals. It was a pleasure to honor Dionne at our 2nd annual GRIT Awards in October. And we’re excited to share more of her story with you.

Pink Petro: What’s the biggest challenge you have faced and how did you overcome it?

DA: One of the biggest challenges I’ve faced both personally and professionally was moving from the UK to Australia. Not only was it a challenging personal transition, but I also had to learn the WA market, major projects and the technical aspects required for working in resources. When I made this move, I was about to turn 30. I was broke and trying to make a new life for myself away from my family and friends. The self-doubt I had during this time period was like nothing I had experienced before. I wanted to run away and go back home to my comfort zone. Fortunately, the thought of failing gave me the drive I needed to kickstart a new life and career. I knew I had to learn the market quickly so I began networking with professionals in the industry. I asked candidates and clients for their feedback and I looked after those who believed in me. In return, I was able to build a reputable personal brand in a competitive market.

What’s one mistake you made and what did you learn from it?

DA: One of the biggest mistakes I made was underestimating how hard the move would be. I moved without much planning. It was very stressful, but I did it. I believed in myself and I worked hard to achieve success. I also had support from sponsors and mentors who I still seek advice from today.

What’s been the most rewarding part of your career?

DA: I love being a people manager and enjoy seeing success in others. One project that sticks out in my mind is the indigenous drive we did for a large LNG operator in Darwin. Their indigenous workforce was 0 and they wanted us to assist them in employing some indigenous candidates in their business. Darwin is a very remote location and it is difficult to source local candidates. However, we were able to provide a shortlist of 22 candidates of which 16 were from an indigenous background. The client put 12 of our candidates through their assessment day and employed 6, of which 3 were indigenous and 1 was female. This was an incredibly rewarding opportunity for me and NES Global Talent.

Who’s been a “gritty” role model for you and why?

DA: Oprah Winfrey is one of my all-time role models. I come from a diverse background myself. My father was born in the Caribbean and my mother is from Scotland. So I can relate to some of the challenges Oprah has faced throughout her career. The strength which Oprah has shown to the world is phenomenal. She has touched the hearts of thousands of people and has not been afraid to bare her soul, emotions and imperfections. It has been inspiring to follow her career and what she has achieved.

Which community service activities/organizations have you been associated with and in what capacity?

  • DA:  Women in Oil and Gas Australia – This is a Lean In circle lead by Veena Mendaz who is a category manager for Chevron. I have been part of the membership since Veena founded the organization 5 years ago and I am now honored to be part of their mentoring program. I am currently mentoring a female project controls engineer.
  • Wirrapanda Foundation – This foundation is an indigenous non-profit organization. We work with the foundation to assist them in placing suitable candidates within the resources industry who have gone through their mentor program.
  • SCLAA – I have had a relationship with this organization for about 5 year. We regularly reach out to them when we are seeking young professionals within the supply chain industry who have completed their degrees and looking for their first full-time position in mining and oil and gas.
  • Leadership – I am the internal diversity rep for APAC at NES Global Talent and run our lean in circles across the region.
  • Pat Thomas Women’s Refuge – I regularly donate clothes, cosmetics and other items to this women’s refuge.
  • Women in Mining – I am currently a member of this organization and am in conversations with them to present at their sundowner later in the year.
  • Brightwater- I am a volunteer as part of their “Music Pharmacy Program” the program works with Dementia patients to engage them in music programs such as personal playlists, group sessions and harp playing.

On the front lines: Why community is core to the Anadarko Stakeholder Relations team

The GRIT Awards is committed to honoring energy’s unsung heroes — the women, men and teams doing the heads-down gritty work of building a new future for energy.

At our first-ever GRIT Awards ceremony back in March, one of the teams we honored was the Colorado Stakeholder Relations team at Anadarko, one of the world’s largest independent oil and natural gas exploration and production companies. Anadarko recently joined Pink Petro as a corporate member. With operations in Colorado, Texas and worldwide, the company is committed to developing, acquiring and exploring for oil and natural gas resources vital to the world’s health and welfare responsibly.

It’s also committed to doing that work in collaboration with the communities surrounding its areas of operations. That’s where the Stakeholder Relations team comes in: Its priority is to communicate with and listen to residents in communities where oil and natural gas development and neighborhoods coexist.

It’s not an easy job as the team strives to do whatever it can to help minimize the inconvenience our world-class operations have on the community when operations and urban expansion coincide.  The role has become vital to how Anadarko operates in the U.S. and beyond.

We spoke with members of the Anadarko Stakeholder Relations team — eight dedicated servant leaders — about how they work and why they love what they do.

PINK PETRO: Give us a look at the role Stakeholder Relations play in Anadarko’s Colorado area of operations.

The Stakeholder Relations team strives to regularly meet citizens with a sense of empathy and understanding to try to find common ground and build trust. They listen with respect and compassion. They attend community events on evenings, weekends and holidays to gain a better understanding of the community’s values and build relationships. They answer the phone without hesitation when a stakeholder calls with an issue and tirelessly try to find solutions that will improve the experience of living near one of the nation’s most important oil and natural gas producing regions. When a solution can’t be found, they remain a resource for community members. They do all of this because they care deeply about the residents who live in the communities where we operate and are unwavering in their commitment to resolving the conflict that arises when oil and natural gas development occurs in urban areas.

PP: What’s one mistake you made and what did you learn from it?

When we first stepped out into the community to establish our social license to operate, the Stakeholder Relations team quickly learned that our efforts would need to go beyond a traditional communications campaign and that tailoring our operations to a growing urban setting was going to be key to changing public sentiment. However, in the beginning one of the mistakes we made was not challenging the internal status quo hard enough during the planning phase for new well development to ensure efficient communication was occurring across our organization. From land to drilling to completions and midstream construction, everyone needed to be informed at every step. We learned it is important to speak up and be persistent when presenting our understanding of the community’s concerns and the need to optimize the plan and improve the compatibility of our operations with the communities. Open and constructive debate leads to better solutions.

PP: What’s been the most rewarding part of your career?

As a Stakeholder Relations representative, you often meet with or speak to members of the community who are upset with the current circumstances relating to oil and natural gas operations. These stakeholders often direct their frustrations at our representatives. The most rewarding part of being a member of this team is seeing how the strategies employed to overcome this dynamic, such as active listening and empathy, can help to garner trust and build lasting relationships with residents.

One example of this is a resident with whom the team has a four-year relationship. The citizen initially called the Anadarko Colorado Response Line very upset at the prospect of having her home sandwiched by two large-scale oil and gas developments. By actively listening, investing the time to understand her issues, and doing what we could to lessen the impact of these temporary operations on her day-to-day life, we were able to build a meaningful relationship with this resident. She has even become a community advocate for Anadarko, often sharing her story about how much the team helped her and encouraging residents who are frustrated with oil and natural gas operations near their homes to reach out.

PP: Who’s been a “gritty” role model for you and why?

Our biggest role models are the men and women working in the field who recognize that it is essential to treat the community with respect. They were doing stakeholder relations long before the Stakeholder Relations team was established. These men and women take time during their day to say hello to a landowner or meet with a concerned citizen and share information. They know the importance of balancing the needs of the people who live near our operations and those of the company.

Our job is to support them and to work with them to ensure they are able to develop the resources all of us need every day to sustain modern life, while also addressing the needs and concerns of residents living near operations.

PP: Which community service activities/organizations have you been associated with and in what capacity?

Anadarko’s Stakeholder Relations team is regularly involved in finding unique opportunities to align values and build meaningful, long-term partnerships with the communities where we operate. 

One of the hallmark community partnerships the Stakeholder Relations team is responsible for is the Mead High School Energy Academy, a unique program designed to immerse students in all facets of the energy industry; from engineering, math and science to data management, welding and pipefitting. In addition to securing financial and in-kind contributions for the program each year, the Stakeholder Relations team was heavily involved in the ideation and development of the program and continues to be actively engaged as the program grows.

Additionally, the Stakeholder Relations team is actively engaged in the community in the following ways:

  • Supporting municipal community events such as festivals and holiday celebrations
  • Filling and delivering backpacks with much needed school supplies to students in need
  • Collaborating with local law enforcement to provide gifts for families in need during the holidays
  • Working with Habitat for Humanity to build homes for veterans and their families
  • Serving meals to residents in need
  • Serving on local nonprofit boards
  • Restoring local trails and outdoor recreation areas

Attend the GRIT Awards on October 3 — www.thegritawards.com